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Thread: Planted atb enclosure

  1. #1
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    Default Planted atb enclosure

    An enclosure I've been working on for an amazon tree boa. I'll be adding more perches, as well as a water dish and a few hides. I think im going to get a mist king as well. Has anyone ever tried to keep an atb in a planted enclosure? I tried to keep things as easy to clean as I could
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    Dont be scared of the snake; Its like a cat without fur and evil intentions

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Planted atb enclosure

    That should look really nice when the plants grow in. I don't think the bromeliads will do well in the soil however. They are epiphytes and may do better if tied onto the wood, a background or hanging basket. Go with the MistKing, you won't regret it!
    Ian Kanda

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Planted atb enclosure

    I did set up the soil with a drainage layer, then. Layer of potting soil, and then a layer of coco husk. Do you still think they won't do well? I'm pretty stoked to go with the most king. i have a few enclosures that are close together, so ill be using the mist king to mist them all
    Dont be scared of the snake; Its like a cat without fur and evil intentions

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Planted atb enclosure

    I have had brom's live more than a year in that sort of substrate, but they never flowered nor did they grow, and they eventually died after never flourishing.
    Ian Kanda

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Planted atb enclosure

    Some constructive advice:

    1. Without a drainage layer most epiphytes will die in your soil.
    Plant tropical vines there if you want, ficus benjamina, or empty it out, and add a drainage hole with a bulkhead and a valve.
    Without a drainage hole, and with a mistking, you could very easily have a sopping wet mess.

    2. Two thirds of your tank is bare. You only have plants on the bottom.
    In the rainforest, that doesn't happen. There are plants all over the trees, cliffsides, etc.
    Every vertical surface is covered. See the pictures below for some ways to do that.
    The bromeliads' stolons are pushed into holes in the wood, as close to the lights as I can get them, and kept wet.
    The Dracula orchids I have in there don't like sopping wet conditions, so I have them in places higher up in the tank that don't get misted by the mistking. They only get a daily manual watering. The moss keeps them moist throughout the day from this daily watering.
    These techniques are called mounting. It's one method of getting plants to grow throughout the rest of the tank than just the bottom.

    3. Bromeliads benefit from air movement, being wet, dilute fertilizer, and bright light.
    If you don't want to do the fertilizer, that's fine, but you have no air movement, and it's the farthest away from the light that you can get them.
    Notice in my pictures that the bromeliads are overexposed compared to the plants on the bottom. They like it really bright.
    If you want, you can add a computer fan to get air movement within your enclosure, but you will need to restrict the ATBs access to it.
    It allows you to have a larger diversity of orchids and other plants to include. They need air movement to prevent mold and bacteria.

    My tank isn't great, but it implements the ideas I've mentioned here.

    What I would change about my tank:

    1. The background on the right side is not really attached.

    2. I will be dismantling this tank to move most of the occupants out of my greenhouse, to the kitchen.
    I'd do this because I want to lower the temperature in the greenhouse, and this tank is the most significant source of heat.
    It will be getting a stand upgrade when it moves to the kitchen.

    3. I'd like to hide the fans, but doing so in the past has reduced air flow. Finding a happy compromise would be nice.

    4. The fertilizer I use causes algae build up on the leaves, so I have to wash it every two months or so.

    5. I'd like to mount the phalaenopsis violaceae & hybrids, but I need a friend to build the mounts, or show me how to build the mounts.
    He's got something special for it that I really like.

    6. Cochleanthes amazonica and Pleurothallis condorensis aren't responding how I would like, so I'm going to have to fiddle with them.

    7. I sold/gave away almost all of my begonia thelmae. I didn't realize until I noticed that there wasn't any cute little white & yellow flowers all over.
    I have a few pieces that are filling up the tank again.

    I'm happy with these aspects of my tank:

    1. The vines are doing great.

    2. The warm growing Draculas are grow great. I had D. inaequalis spiking like crazy, but the buds would always blast just before opening.
    Perhaps the buds were too wet for too long, or maybe it's something else. I've moved it elsewhere in the greenhouse to see if I can get them to open.
    The Draculas I have in there now are lotax, mopsus, and vespertillo.
    When placed in brighter light, Draculas will grow smaller than usual. Usually they are quite large plants, because they usually grow in lower light.
    They need good air movement, and consistently high humidity to grow in bright light, or they get sunburn/heat stress.
    New additions such as Lepenthes calodictoyon, L. telipogoniflora, Pleurothallis grobyi, and P. grobyi small are all doing great.
    I was a little worried about adding them, but it would seem that those worries were baseless.

    3. Bromeliads are doing great. I've had a few flower, and with the bright light, they color up nicely.

    4. Phalaenopsis violaceae & hybrids was initially my wife's contribution to the greenhouse, but we found they were only happy in this environment.
    They have become some of the most rewarding plants in the collection. They are in bloom for quite a few months, fragrant, and were very forgiving of our initial troubleshooting.

    5. The mites I had a few months ago were treated with End All pesticide, and never came back. Frogs are doing fine. The important step was rinsing the tank for a half hour.

    6. The frogs seem ok with the fertilizer I'm using, and not getting supplemented. I'm going on two or three years on this regimen.
    I heard one of the frogs calling when I had them on display at the Orchid Show. It would seem that I'm not cycling, and that's why I'm not getting breeding.

    I hope that you enjoyed and benefited from this information.
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    Last edited by lordoftheswarms; 04-26-2014 at 06:39 AM.
    Adam Foster 780-757-8538 Orchids, vivaria, and a few other things
    Find me on Flickr: lordoftheswarms

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Bonnie doon, edmonton
    Posts
    80

    Default Re: Planted atb enclosure

    I appreciate all of the advice, thank you. I moved my broms and I have a spot in mind for a fan. Ill post more pictures when it is done
    Dont be scared of the snake; Its like a cat without fur and evil intentions

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