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Thread: Interesting article on Pacific Chorus Frogs and chytridiomycosis...

  1. #1
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    Default Interesting article on Pacific Chorus Frogs and chytridiomycosis...

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0312192841.htm

    Yet another reason to NOT introduce native species into your collection, or vice versa, back into the wild after brief captivity. Very interesting article.
    ~ Tracey ~
    Mom to 5 and a min Aus Shepherd and two cats


  2. #2
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    Default Re: Interesting article on Pacific Chorus Frogs and chytridiomycosis...

    On a related note, many of the Albertan leopard frogs populations are doing well in chytrid infected waters. Unsure if it's developed resistance, or if chytrid was never a problem for these frogs.
    Ian Kanda
    I'm happy to represent both the herp hobby and conservation.
    Please donate here to save gartersnakes! http://igg.me/p/725959/x/6825185

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Interesting article on Pacific Chorus Frogs and chytridiomycosis...

    Chytrid seems to have the biggest impacts at high altitude, and I suspect that's because of overall lower average temperatures. Here, frogs are probably routinely exposed to chytrid, but spend a sizable portion of the year at temperatures too low for its growth, while in the summer they can easily raise their body temperature well past what chytrid can handle. When I've found wood frogs in boggy areas in comfortable weather [20ish], the temperature in those little pits of mud was probably into the 40s because of sun, dark surface, and shelter from air movement. Under cover of a tropical cloud forest, the temperature is pretty much year-round within chytrid preference. In temperate montane regions, the winters may be cold, but there may be a shortage of summer heat to arrest growth for many montane amphibians.
    The trend is to post names and numbers of "pets" here. That seems...um...bulky.
    23+ species of salamander
    28+ families and subfamilies of reptile, amphibian, and arachnid.
    Only one has a name. The Beast.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Interesting article on Pacific Chorus Frogs and chytridiomycosis...

    Do you wonder about inter species contamination though?? What influence these frogs may have as carriers on other species such as native salamanders?? Just curious on that regards.
    ~ Tracey ~
    Mom to 5 and a min Aus Shepherd and two cats


  5. #5
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    Default Re: Interesting article on Pacific Chorus Frogs and chytridiomycosis...

    Chytrid maps are far from complete and the paths of spread are poorly understood. This isn't a common pet frog, so if it has it, chances are the local salamanders have already been exposed. I have an experiment in developement that will explore a link from pet to wild disease populations but it is currently on the backburner until I have more resources to work on it.

    As per the wild chytrid environment, I'd have to look back into my notes but I rarely record ground temperatures over 23C in wetlands. [edit: meant as actual wet land surrounding the water body; the highest GT's I have recorded sans rocks and pavement approach the 30's) So chytrid may not be a problem for wood frogs in an open area, but anything that is tree'd, I'd say chytrid is fine to grow. Even in an open area, if the water is deep enough to not overheat, there will aways be a reservoir for the bacteria and it may be disasterous to the larval stages that cannot exit the water.
    Last edited by joeysgreen; 03-20-2012 at 03:32 PM.
    Ian Kanda
    I'm happy to represent both the herp hobby and conservation.
    Please donate here to save gartersnakes! http://igg.me/p/725959/x/6825185

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Interesting article on Pacific Chorus Frogs and chytridiomycosis...

    Interesting theory on the temps Ian...you will HAVE to come out this spring when the wetlands by our place starts to thaw and do an initial walk through and then maybe I can do some temping over the summer for you. The one particular area TEEMS with frogs and I suspect the water itself is not overly deep. My guess would be it would be 23 celsius on a really hot day...this particular area does have branches/shrubs in the actual water area but there is another area I'll have to take you on a hike through that leads to a bigger wetland where the geese migrate into each spring.
    ~ Tracey ~
    Mom to 5 and a min Aus Shepherd and two cats


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